2004

Bickford, David . “Using Direct Linking Capabilities in Aggregated Databases for E-Reserves.” In The Eleventh Off-Campus Library Services Conference Proceedings: Scottsdale, Arizona, May 5 -7, 2004, edited by Patrick B. Mahoney. Mount Pleasant, MI: Central Michigan University, 2004, 21-31. Reprinted in Journal of Library Administration 41, no. 1/2 (2004): 31-45.
This research analyzes whether the major aggregated databases, EBSCO, Gale, Ovid, and ProQuest, can be used easily and successfully for electronic reserves. Academic libraries have created electronic reserves by scanning articles from the print, saving them as pdf files, and then storing them to a server for retrieval by students during the semester. This process creates logistical, legal, and economic challenges for libraries, which could be alleviated if the aggregators provided a mechanism to create direct links to articles that could be used reliably outside of the original session. The author includes details about how this can be done for each of the four aggregated databases and offers suggestions and caveats, as well. In addition, he discusses the potential link resolvers and the Open URL standard may have in simplifying article retrieval from aggregated databases. He concludes by suggesting future research possibilities in a cost-benefit comparison between direct linking to aggregated content and the traditional way libraries have provided an electronic reserve collection. E. Onega.

Magusin, Elaine and Kay Johnson. “Collaborating on Electronic Course Reserves to Support Student Success.” In The Eleventh Off-Campus Library Services Conference Proceedings: Scottsdale, Arizona, May 5 -7, 2004, edited by Patrick B. Mahoney. Mount Pleasant, MI: Central Michigan University, 2004, 189-195. Reprinted in Journal of Library Administration 41, no. 1/2 (2004): 255-264.
A home-grown electronic reserves module (The Digital Reading Room, or DRR) to support distance students at Athabasca University has been in place since 2002, after the library decided it needed something more flexible than the vendor-supplied product they had been using. After an initial pilot, the DRR has become established as gateway to digital resources, both through the library’s databases and material provided by the teaching faculty. Very little material that needs to clear copyright is included in the DRR, though document delivery requests for required or suggested readings are handled through this system. Benefits to students are discussed, as is the boon to information literacy provided by the simple boost in awareness of library resources provided by the DRR. P. Pival.

2003

Magusin, Elaine, Kay Johnson, and Tony Tin. “Library Services: Designing the Digital Reading Room to Support Online Learning.” Paper presented at Distance Learning 2003: The 19th Annual Conference on Distance Teaching and Learning, August 13-15, 2003, Madison Wisconsin.
Athabasca University developed its Digital Reading Room (DRR) as an interactive, integrated approach to providing distance learners with required and supplementary course materials in a variety of formats. A collaborative effort among librarians, faculty and educational media developers, the DRR is a repository for course reserve readings as well as learning objects. The DRR is part of the larger Digital Reference Center (DRC), which includes an online reference collection and subject guides developed collaboratively by librarians and faculty. Advantages of having faculty participate in the creation of subject guides include the subject expertise that they bring to the project and the increased propensity of faculty members to use and promote a resource that they helped develop. Librarians integrate information literacy resources and instruction into the subject guides. J. Markgraf.

2002

Algenio, Emilie R. “The Virtual Reserve Room: Extending Library Services Off-Campus.” In The Tenth Off-Campus Library Services Conference Proceedings: Cincinnati, Ohio, April 17-19, 2002, edited by Patrick B. Mahoney. Mount Pleasant, MI: Central Michigan University, 2002, 11-18. Reprinted in Journal of Library Administration 37, no. 1/2 (2002): 15-25.
This detailed case study describes the context and development the University of Massachusetts Amherst’s electronic reserve system. Docutek’s Eres system was selected from several commercial solutions, all of which are described. Timetables for the pilot and full implementation phases are provided, along with statistics showing content and usage from milestone points in the project. Implementation issues are addressed, including faculty concerns, copyright permissions, and incorporation of licensed e-books and full-text database content. Start-up costs are summarized, including staffing, hardware & software, and copyright fees. The remainder of the paper focuses on ongoing issues, lessons learned, and developments on the horizon. A. Prestamo.

Burich, Nancy J. “Blackboard and XanEdu: A New Model for an Old Service.” In The Tenth Off-Campus Library Services Conference Proceedings: Cincinnati, Ohio, April 17-19, 2002, edited by Patrick B. Mahoney. Mount Pleasant, MI: Central Michigan University, 2002, 77-92. Reprinted in Journal of Library Administration 37, no. 1/2 (2002): 101-116.
In March 2001 the University of Kansas (KU) signed a Campus Partners Agreement to conduct a trial XanEdu’s coursepack service. XanEdu was selected because of its partnership with Blackboard, which is KU’s supported courseware system. The paper outlines the trial phase, including project management, issues encountered with the reading list for the course that was selected for the trial, and assessment. Greater detail is provided in six appendices, including: (A) the KU/XanEdu Campus Partners Agreement; (B) the XanEdu CoursePack Evaluation completed by the trial phase faculty member; (C) Journal Copyright Fees for trial phase reading lists; (D) Report on the XanEdu Trial; (E) Lessons Learned from Four CoursePacks; and (F) Impact of Fair Use Guidelines on Electronic Reserves. A. Prestamo.

Kartus, Ebe, Donna Runner, and Susan Clarke. “Digitisation and Copyright Compliance for Course Materials and Library Reserve Materials at Deakin University. “Paper presented at the Your Time, Your Place, Your Off Campus Library Service Conference, Monash University, Caulfield Campus, Melbourne, Victoria, 4-5 February 2002.
A digitization effort employed by Deakin University Library has proven to be of great benefit to its distance and lifelong learners. This paper discusses issues involved with digitization and copyright compliance issues associated with producing electronic information resources made available to distance and lifelong learners at Deakin University. The authors discus the balance between print and e-reserves, the differences in course-pack content and electronic reserves and the copyright compliance issues that regulate fair access. Budgetary concerns, in terms of staff time, computer equipment were weighed to determine efficiency. The project was carried out in several phases, beginning with the digitization of class notes, exams, class presentations, and finally with the materials covered within copyright regulations. A respective project would complete the project. It was found that there was a significant financial savings in the digitization of electronic reserves, yet the main goal was to better serve the remote user with enhanced access. Relevant screenshots and bibliography are included. M. Thomas.

Wilson, Pat. “The Ins and Outs of Providing Electronic Reserves for Distance Learning Classes.” In The Tenth Off-Campus Library Services Conference Proceedings: Cincinnati, Ohio, April 17-19, 2002, edited by Patrick B. Mahoney. Mount Pleasant, MI: Central Michigan University, 2002, 413-422. Reprinted in Journal of Library Administration 37, no. 3/4 (2002): 537-548.
Distance Learning Library Services (DLLS) at the University of Kentucky (UK) serves the needs of students enrolled in UK Distance Learning Programs (DLP). DLLS began offering E-reserves in Fall 2000. This pilot program benefited from the UK Main Library’s existing E-Reserve system and the Main Library’s model was adopted. Funding for copyright fees was provided by DLP. Policies, procedures, and marketing strategies for the pilot are outlined, including a sample brochure in Appendix A. The paper follows the scope and evolution of the project from Fall 2000 through Fall 2001 semesters. Statistics for each of the semesters show the number of articles mounted and costs involved. A database was created to manage and track readings by course, and a second database documents copyright clearance information by publisher. Samples of each database are presented in Appendices B and C, respectively. A. Prestamo.

2001

Cody, Sue Ann, Dan Pfohl, and Sharon Bittner. “Establishing and Refining Electronic Course Reserves: A Case Study of a Continuous Process.” Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery and Information Supply11, no. 3 (2001): 11-37.
The creation and evolution of Electronic Course Reserves at the University of North Caroline-Wilmington is described in detail. This case study documents this process from summer 1998 through spring 2000. Detailed technical information is provided, including server and storage requirements, creation of bibliographic records in Innovative Interfaces library system, as well as other hardware and software requirements. Workflows are described in great detail and sample forms are provided. Methods of linking to licensed online content from numerous aggregators and publishers are included. The authors point out that linking to licensed content is highly desirable because it saves local production time, and avoids the need to obtain copyright clearance. Assessment of the system has been a continuous process, and issues identified by the production staff, reference librarians, and end users are summarized. The authors conclude that their system will likely continue to undergo revision as technological innovations occur. Although the process has been challenging and highly labor intensive, the value of, and the demand for the service justifies the efforts. A. Prestamo.

2000

Calvert, Hildegund M. “Document Delivery Options for Distance Education Students and Electronic Reserve Service at Ball State University Libraries.” In The Ninth Off-Campus Library Services Conference Proceedings: Portland, Oregon, April 26 -28, 2000, compiled by P. Steven Thomas. Mount Pleasant, MI: Central Michigan University, 2000, 73-82. Reprinted in Journal of Library Administration 31, no. 3/4 (2001): 109-125.
An extensive literature review of the evolution of document delivery services and the growth of distance learning programs sets the stage in this paper. Distance learning programs and existing document delivery services at Ball State University are described. Document delivery services use a combination of the Research Library Group’s Ariel software and the National Library of Medicine’s DocView software, enabling delivery of articles to distance learning students via email. An Electronic Reserves Working Group was formed in March of 1997, and a pilot program began in spring 1998. During the initial semester, seven instructors placed 69 articles on E-Reserve. In summer 1998 the library migrated to a new automation system, which provided new options for providing access to E-Reserve materials. Web File Manager, a locally developed application, aided in file transfer, password protection, and copyright management. Scanning workflows are described. Use of the E-Reserve system grew 553% from spring 1998 to spring 1999. The author concludes with an exhortation to librarians to be proactive in provision of document delivery services and E-Reserves, or run the risk of being marginalized by commercial services willing to meet these needs. A. Prestamo.

Lowe, Susan and Joyce Rumery. “Services to Distance Learners: Planning for E-Reserves and Copyright.” In The Ninth Off-Campus Library Services Conference Proceedings: Portland, Oregon, April 26 -28, 2000, compiled by P. Steven Thomas. Mount Pleasant, MI: Central Michigan University, 2000, 213-220. Reprinted in Journal of Library Administration 32, no. 1/2 (2001): 319-330.
The University of Maine System’s Off-Campus Library Services Office (OCLS) serves the information needs of distance learning students enrolled through the University of Maine System Network (UNET). The history, services, and scope of UNET and OCLS are described, with particular focus on development of E-Reserve and Copyright Task Forces to address policy issues inherent in provision of library resources to off-campus students. The E-Reserve Task Force was charged with development of a system that would enable faculty to easily create digital content, and facilitate ease of access for students to the digital content. The resulting E-Reserve system is described, along with a list of problems encountered during implementation. The conclusion emphasizes the need for continuous assessment and revision of the E-Reserve system to respond to the needs of faculty and students and technological change. Librarians must monitor pending legislation and revise local policies as new legislation is adopted. (See additional information on the Copyright aspects of this article in Chapter 4: Organization, Planning and Regulatory Issues: Copyright.) A. Prestamo.

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